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  • Ah ah ah https://t.co/Ou3BoHpLA8 2 years 40 weeks ago
  • on the other hand, @AtomEditor's git GUI is very productive, so it still has my preference over @code 2 years 40 weeks ago
  • I wonder if #vscode users do use #git... The GUI is just impractical on a daily basis, I always end up switching to command line 2 years 40 weeks ago
  • Important to know that this exists ! This new technology called a "Speaking Portrait" allows any still photo to be… https://t.co/AP8GVnst2N 2 years 42 weeks ago
  • RT @Thom_astro: Le Vésuve et #Naples. Les montagnes sont toujours plus spectaculaires prises avec un léger angle qu’à la verticale parfaite… 2 years 43 weeks ago
  • Knew that already, but may be of some interest for tech beginners... https://t.co/9WIhTRIYyW 2 years 45 weeks ago
  • RT @stefanolaru: 3 hours of debugging can save you 5 mins of reading the docs. 2 years 45 weeks ago
  • Like a #scifi movie, except it's real 2 years 47 weeks ago
  • First paragraphs are just so confuse... Anyway the rest is a great & straight description of #sleep states in… https://t.co/dDLejX0SXO 2 years 47 weeks ago
  • RT @github: A pixel editor in the terminal? Why not! https://t.co/0d2xHvyyXJ 2 years 47 weeks ago

MinGW

python Building PyCrypto for Win32

The PyCrypto library provides Python with implementation for a lot of algorithms for cryptography. It's very useful.

Ubuntu has it by default but if you want to have it for Python 3.2 on Windows, you must use Active Python, as there is no other binary release for Python 3.2 on the web.

In case you want to use the official Python distribution or if ActiveState did not (yet) released a PyCrypto for the version of Python you are using, this article might help you by putting together the steps to build it from source.

Also attached : a binary exe for the impatients.

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